Make a bongo cajón: a plywood bongo drum. Free plans, easy woodworking project.

Make a bongo cajón: a plywood bongo drum. Free plans, easy woodworking project.


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Welcome to our blog post where we will be discussing the topics covered in the YouTube video titled “” In this video, the host demonstrates the step-by-step process of creating a bongo cajón using plywood. From selecting interesting pieces of wood to cutting and assembling the drum, every detail is covered in this easy woodworking project. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced woodworker, this video provides valuable insights and tips for creating your own bongo cajón. So, let’s dive into the world of woodworking and explore the art of making a plywood bongo drum.

Below Table of Contents

1. “How to Build Your Own Bongo Cajón: Easy Woodworking Project”

In order to build your own bongo cajón, you will first need to gather the necessary materials. When shopping for wood, whether at a home center or a lumberyard, it is important to take the time to search for interesting pieces. Sometimes, overlooked boards can be perfect for this project. Start by cutting out strips of wood that are approximately six and a quarter inches wide, which you can later resize. Tilting your blade to an eighth degree angle, cut both edges of the strips. These will be used as the shorter side pieces, requiring only two edge bevels.

Next, use a crosscut sled to cut out the two short end pieces. Set your miter gauge to an 8-degree angle to ensure the sides are of equal length. If necessary, trim a bit off both sides to ensure their uniformity. Replace the saw blade with a half-inch dado stack to cut out the rabbet on the ends of the longer piece. Use the crosscut sled again to cut out the dado for the divider. Make sure that both dedos match up on the same side.

To finalize the shape of the cajón, trim the longer pieces down to size. Take a side piece with a bevel on it and mark where it should be flush. Measure over an inch and a half from each side, and then measure up an inch and a half. Connect these points with a thin piece of wood and repeat the process for the side pieces. Use double-sided tape to hold them together and cut them out on a bandsaw.

Once the pieces are cut, temporarily assemble them to ensure the divider piece fits. For the top surface, cut out a piece of thin eighth-inch luan mahogany plywood. Finally, use a quarter-inch roundover bit in your router to smooth out all sharp edges. With these steps, you will soon have your own bongo cajón ready to be played.

2. “Choosing the Perfect Wood for Your Bongo Cajón: A Home Center or Lumberyard Guide”

When choosing the perfect wood for your bongo cajón, whether you’re shopping at a home center or a lumberyard, it’s worth taking the time to search for interesting pieces. Sometimes, overlooked boards can provide unique character to your instrument. Start by cutting out strips that are approximately six and a quarter inches wide. You can adjust the size later. To create edge bevels, tilt your blade to an eighth-degree angle and cut both edges. A crosscut sled can be used to cut the two shorter end pieces at an eight-degree angle. Make sure these sides are the same length for symmetry.

To create a rabbet on the longer piece, replace your saw blade with a half-inch dado stack. Then, use the crosscut sled to cut the dado for the divider. Ensure that both dado cuts match up on the same side by putting the other piece in backward. If mistakes occur, remember that they can be fixed without being pointed out. Trim the longer pieces down to size by marking where they’ll be flush with the side piece with a bevel. To cut out the curve, measure over an inch and a half from each side and measure up an inch and a half. Connect these points using a thin piece of wood, and repeat the process for the side pieces, starting at an inch and a quarter over.

Temporarily assemble the pieces using double-sided tape to fit the divider piece. Use an eighth-inch luan mahogany plywood for the top by tracing its size. Finally, use a quarter-inch roundover bit in a router to smooth out the sharp edges. By carefully selecting and cutting the wood, you can create a unique and visually appealing bongo cajón.

3. “Step-by-Step Guide: Cutting and Assembling the Bongo Cajón Components”

When starting to make a bongo Cajón, it’s important to choose the right wood for the components. Whether you’re shopping at a home center or a lumberyard, take the time to find interesting pieces of wood. Often, boards that may not be considered “perfect” by others can actually add character to your instrument. Once you have your wood, begin by cutting out strips that are approximately six and a quarter inches wide using a saw tilted to an eighth-degree angle. Later, you can trim them down to the exact size.

To create the shorter side pieces, use a crosscut sled to cut out the two end pieces with an eight-degree angle. It’s crucial to make sure both sides are the same length. If needed, trim a small amount from both ends to achieve perfect symmetry. Next, change your saw blade to a half-inch dado stack to cut out the rabbet on the ends of the longer piece. Use the crosscut sled again to cut out the dado for the divider, ensuring both dedos match up on the same side.

To cut the longer pieces to size, use the side piece with the bevel as a guide. Make a mark where it will be flush and perform the cut accordingly. To create the curves on the side pieces, measure over an inch and a half from each side and up an inch and a half. Connect these points using a thin piece of wood, and repeat the process for the other side pieces, starting an inch and a quarter over. Use double-sided tape to secure the pieces together and then cut them out on a bandsaw.

Temporarily assemble the components to determine the proper placement for the divider piece. Cut out a thin eighth-inch luan mahogany plywood for the top, using the divider as a template. After all the parts are cut, ease the sharp edges with a quarter-inch roundover bit in a router to ensure a smooth finish. In the next section, we will explore the final steps of assembling the bongo Cajón components.

4. “Adding the Finishing Touches: Trimming, Shaping, and Final Assembly of Your Bongo Cajón

In this section, we will discuss the steps involved in adding the finishing touches to your bongo Cajón, including trimming, shaping, and final assembly.

When selecting wood for your Cajón, it is worth taking the time to browse through the options available and find some interesting pieces. Often, boards that have slight imperfections or unique characteristics are overlooked by others in their pursuit of perfection. These types of boards can add character and visual appeal to your instrument.

To begin, cut out strips of wood that are approximately six and a quarter inches wide. The exact size can be adjusted later. Tilt your blade to an eighth-degree angle and cut both edges of the strips. These angled cuts will be used for the shorter side pieces of the Cajón. Use a crosscut sled and set your miter gauge to an eight-degree angle to cut out the two short end pieces. Make sure the two sides are of the same length for symmetrical assembly.

Next, trim a small portion off both sides of the end pieces to ensure they are exactly the same length. Replace the saw blade with a half-inch dado stack to create a rabbet on the ends of the longer piece. Use the crosscut sled to cut out the dado for the divider, making sure that both dados match up on the same side. If any mistakes are made during the process, don’t worry—remember that woodworking allows room for adjustments.

Afterward, trim the longer pieces down to size, aligning them with the beveled side and marking where they should be flush. To create the curved shape of the Cajón, measure an inch and a half from each side and an inch and a half up. Connect these points using a thin piece of wood that can be bent. Repeat this process for the side pieces, starting at an inch and a quarter over. Secure all the pieces together using double-sided tape and cut them out on a bandsaw.

Temporarily assemble the Cajón to ensure a proper fit for the divider piece. Cut a piece of thin eighth-inch Luan mahogany plywood and use it for the top of the Cajón. Trace its size onto the plywood and cut it out using appropriate tools. Finally, use a router with a quarter-inch roundover bit to ease over any sharp edges on the Cajón, ensuring a smooth and comfortable playing experience.

Q&A

Q: What is the topic of the YouTube video?
A: The topic of the YouTube video is about making a bongo cajón, which is a plywood bongo drum. The video provides free plans and demonstrates an easy woodworking project.

Q: Who made the bongo cajón in the video?
A: The bongo cajón in the video was made by the person creating the video, as inspired by Ted Derryberry, who made one for Spencer.

Q: What is recommended when shopping for wood?
A: When shopping for wood, it is recommended to take the time to look through the wood and find interesting pieces. Often, people overlook imperfect boards in their pursuit of perfection.

Q: What size are the strips initially cut out for the project?
A: The strips initially cut out for the project are about six and a quarter inches wide.

Q: What angle is the blade tilted to?
A: The blade is tilted to an eighth-degree angle.

Q: How are the shorter side pieces cut?
A: The shorter side pieces are cut using a crosscut sled at an 8-degree angle.

Q: How is the rabbet cut on the longer piece?
A: The rabbet on the ends of the longer piece is cut using a half-inch dado stack on the saw.

Q: What mistake is made during the process, and how is it addressed?
A: The mistake is made where the dados on the two pieces do not match up. However, the mistake is fixed by adjusting the stop block and realigning the pieces to cut in the correct spot.

Q: How are the longer pieces trimmed to size?
A: The longer pieces are trimmed by using a side piece with a bevel on it as a guide and marking where it will be flush.

Q: How is the curve on the side pieces cut out?
A: The curve on the side pieces is cut out by measuring over an inch and a half from each side and then measuring up an inch and a half. A thin piece of wood is used to connect these points and the curve is cut out.

Q: What material is used for the top of the bongo cajón?
A: An eighth inch luan mahogany plywood is used for the top of the bongo cajón.

Q: How are the sharp edges of the cajón eased over?
A: The sharp edges of the cajón are eased over using a quarter inch roundover bit in a router.

Final Notes

In conclusion, the YouTube video titled “Make a bongo cajón: a plywood bongo drum. Free plans, easy woodworking project” provides a step-by-step guide on how to create your own bongo cajón drum. The video features a demonstration of a bongo cajón being played, showcasing the impressive sound quality that can be achieved through this DIY project.

The creator of the video, inspired by Ted Derryberry, shares useful tips on selecting the right wood for the drum and encourages viewers to search for interesting pieces that may be overlooked by others. The demonstration highlights the importance of meticulous measurements and precise cuts to ensure the proper construction of the drum.

Although the creator encounters a minor setback during the process, it emphasizes that mistakes are a part of woodworking and can often be fixed without compromising the final result. The video concludes with the assembling of the drum and the addition of a thin luan mahogany plywood top.

Overall, this video provides valuable instructions and insights into the world of woodworking, specifically in creating a bongo cajón drum. By following the provided plans and techniques, anyone with basic woodworking skills can embark on this easy and rewarding project. So why not give it a try and experience the joy of creating your own musical instrument?
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This article will explain how to make a creative instrument between a bongo and cajon drum – a bongo-cajón, using simple materials and available instructions.

This project requires only basic woodworking skills and some common tools. Materials include a single 3/4 inch sheet of exterior grade plywood, screws, and the optional application of paint. The design is a simple two-piece construction and can be completed in about an hour.

The simple construction methods and design require no special tools, and can be easily completed with a drill and saw. The two pieces, a base and a soundboard, are cut from the plywood and assembled using screws. The base is a simple square, while the soundboard has two sections – the center square with the cajón-style sound hole, surrounded by four bongo-style cutouts. Once assembled, the soundboard is attached to the base with two screws, to create the finished bongo-cajón.

The bongo-cajón is played in a manner similar to standard bongo drums with hands, although occasionally sticks can be used. The cajón-style sound hole resonates, giving it a woody and mellow tone.

To enhance the appearance, the bongo-cajón can be painted with a low-odor paint, such as wall paint. A few coats of paint and a layer of clear polyurethane can give the wood a lasting finish, while still allowing the natural look and sound of the wood to remain.

This is an easy woodworking project to make a versatile and creative instrument with an accessible and traditional design. With the materials and instructions, anyone can make a bongo-cajón.


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