I Tried A 250-Year-Old Pumpkin Pie Recipe • Tasty

I Tried A 250-Year-Old Pumpkin Pie Recipe • Tasty

Welcome to our blog post, where we delve into the intriguing world of historical recipes. Today, we are exploring the fascinating history of pumpkin pie, focusing on a 250-year-old recipe. Inspired by the Tasty YouTube video titled “I Tried A 250-Year-Old Pumpkin Pie Recipe,” we embark on a culinary journey back in time. Thanksgiving, known for its delectable feasts, has always been synonymous with pumpkin pie. However, this iconic dessert has come a long way since its humble beginnings. To gather insights into the historical roots of pumpkin pie, we interview Paul Friedman, a distinguished professor of history at Yale University and author of “American Cuisine and How It Got This Way.” Join us as we uncover the origins, evolution, and unique aspects of the original pumpkin pie recipe, as documented by the Gardner family in Boston. So, prepare yourself for a tantalizing adventure through time as we recreate this ancient delicacy. Let’s get cooking!

Below Table of Contents

1. Unearthing the Roots of Pumpkin Pie: Exploring the Historical Origins of a Thanksgiving Staple

Today, we’re diving into the historical origins of a Thanksgiving staple: pumpkin pie. No holiday celebrates food quite like Thanksgiving, and behind every turkey, there’s the star of the show, pumpkin pie. To uncover the roots of this tasty dish, we spoke with Paul Friedman, a professor of history at Yale and the author of “American Cuisine and How It Got This Way.”

Pumpkin pie has been around since the 17th and 18th centuries, shortly after the discovery of the New World and the growth of trade. Pumpkin, being a new world product, made its way into European recipes. However, the original pumpkin pie wasn’t as sweet or custardy as the ones we’re used to today. In fact, it was more of a savory dish than a dessert.

Interestingly, pumpkin pie wasn’t always associated with Thanksgiving. The holiday itself wasn’t nationally celebrated until after the Civil War, when there was a revival of interest in the colonial era. It became an object of fashion and sentimentality. The recipe we’ll be exploring is from a well-off family named Gardner in Boston. It includes pumpkin slices and apple slices, hinting at the colonists’ desire to live like Europeans.

Now that we have a better understanding of pumpkin pie’s historical background, we can appreciate this quintessential Thanksgiving dessert even more. Stay tuned as we delve into Mrs. Gardner’s 1763 recipe and bring the flavors of the past into our kitchens.

Key Points:

  • Pumpkin pie originated in the 17th and 18th centuries after the discovery of the New World.
  • It was initially a savory dish and not as sweet as modern versions.
  • Thanksgiving itself wasn’t nationally celebrated until after the Civil War.
  • The recipe we’ll be exploring combines pumpkin and apple slices.

2. From Pumpkins to Pies: Tracing the Evolution of Pumpkin Pie from Colonial Times to Present Day

In the history of pumpkin pie, we can trace its origins back to the 17th and 18th centuries. Pumpkin, being a new world product, started appearing in European recipes after the discovery of the new world and the growth of trade. The original pumpkin pie was more of a sweet dish rather than the custardy and soft version we are familiar with today. In fact, everything nowadays is sweeter than it was in the past.

Initially, pumpkin pie was not specifically associated with any holiday. It wasn’t until after the Civil War, when Thanksgiving was proclaimed as a holiday, that pumpkin pie became synonymous with the Thanksgiving feast. Interestingly, the revival of interest in the colonial era and the rise of sentimentality transformed pumpkin pie from a symbol of poverty to an object of fashion.

One interesting recipe for pumpkin pie comes from the Gardner family, a well-off family in Boston. The colonists, who wanted to live like Europeans, mixed apple slices with pumpkin slices in their recipe. What makes this recipe unusual is the large quantities it calls for, suggesting that pumpkin pie was a popular dish for many people. Today, we can recreate this historical recipe using Mrs. Gardner’s receipts from 1763.

With this newfound knowledge and armed with Mrs. Gardner’s pumpkin pie recipe, we can embark on our journey to make a delicious pumpkin pie. Stay tuned for the next episode where we will follow the steps outlined in the recipe, including paring and coring 25 apples, before moving on to the next stage. Let’s get cooking and discover the taste of pumpkin pie as it was enjoyed in colonial times!

3. A Tasty Journey Through Time: Recreating a 18th Century Pumpkin Pie Recipe from Mrs. Gardner’s Collection

Welcome back to Edible History, where we make history palatable. In this episode, we are diving into the fascinating history of pumpkin pie, a holiday classic. Contrary to popular belief, the first pumpkin pies weren’t made with pre-mashed pumpkin in a can. To gain a better understanding of the origins of pumpkin pie, we consulted Paul Friedman, a history professor at Yale and the author of “American Cuisine and How It Got This Way.”

Pumpkin pie dates back to the 17th and 18th centuries, when pumpkin became popular in European recipes after the discovery of the New World. However, the original pumpkin pie was quite different from what we enjoy today. It was not as sweet or custardy as modern versions. The pumpkin would be sliced and incorporated into the recipe alongside apple slices, as the colonists preferred European ingredients over New World ones.

Interestingly, pumpkin pie wasn’t always associated with Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving itself wasn’t nationally celebrated until after the Civil War. But during the post-war era, there was a revival of interest in the colonial era, and pumpkin pie became a symbol of fashion and sentimentality. Now, let’s take a closer look at a specific recipe for pumpkin pie from the Gardner family, a wealthy family from Boston in the 18th century.

The Gardner family’s recipe, which we will be recreating, includes both apple and pumpkin slices. What sets this recipe apart is the large quantity of ingredients, indicating it was likely made to serve a crowd. We are fortunate to have Mrs. Gardner’s receipts from 1763 to guide us as we embark on our pumpkin pie-making journey. Before we begin, let’s start by paring and coring 25 apples, or a quarter of a hundred apples as they would have said in the 18th century.

Stay tuned as we continue our tasty journey through time by recreating this 18th century pumpkin pie recipe. Get ready to experience pumpkin pie like never before!

4. The Sweet and Savory History of Pumpkin Pie: Uncovering the Surprising Ingredients and Influences

In our previous episodes, we’ve explored the fascinating history behind some of our favorite holiday dishes. Today, we will delve into the mouthwatering world of pumpkin pie. Thanksgiving, a holiday known for its abundance of delicious food, simply wouldn’t be complete without this iconic treat. But have you ever wondered about the origins of pumpkin pie? Let’s find out!

According to Paul Friedman, a renowned professor of history at Yale and author of “American Cuisine and How It Got This Way,” the history of pumpkin pie can be traced back to the 17th and 18th centuries. As a New World product, pumpkins gained popularity in European recipes after the discovery of the Americas and the subsequent increase in trade. However, the pumpkin pie of the colonial era differed from the custardy and soft version we know today. It was more of a savory dish, and definitely not as sweet as modern variations.

Interestingly, pumpkin pie wasn’t always synonymous with Thanksgiving. The holiday itself wasn’t celebrated nationally until the Civil War. In fact, it was during this post-war period that there was a revival of interest in the colonial era, including its cuisine. People began to view pumpkin pie not just as a simple dish but as a symbol of fashion and sentimentality. Its association with Thanksgiving solidified, making it a holiday staple for many.

To better understand the traditional preparation of pumpkin pie, we turn to a historical recipe from the Gardner family in Boston. This recipe is unique as it combines both pumpkin and apple slices, reflecting the colonists’ preference for European tastes. Additionally, the recipe calls for large quantities, suggesting it was meant to feed a considerable number of people. Armed with this knowledge, we are ready to embark on our pumpkin pie-making adventure, following Mrs. Gardner’s recipe from 1763.

Stay tuned as we peel and core dozens of apples and discover the secrets to creating a truly delectable pumpkin pie. You won’t want to miss this culinary journey into the past!

*Note: The content has been edited for clarity and conciseness.

Q&A

Q: What is the topic of the YouTube video?
A: The topic of the YouTube video is “I Tried A 250-Year-Old Pumpkin Pie Recipe”.

Q: Who is the host of the YouTube video?
A: The host of the YouTube video is not mentioned in the given transcript.

Q: Who did the host talk to about the history of pumpkin pie?
A: The host talked to Paul Friedman, a professor of history at Yale and the author of “American Cuisine and How It Got This Way”.

Q: How far back does the history of pumpkin pie go?
A: The history of pumpkin pie goes back to the 17th and 18th century.

Q: Was pumpkin pie originally a sweet dish or a savory dish?
A: Pumpkin pie was more of a savory dish in the colonial era and it wouldn’t have been as sweet as it is today.

Q: When did pumpkin pie become a holiday dish?
A: Pumpkin pie became associated with holidays, particularly Thanksgiving, after the Civil War.

Q: Is there anything unique about the recipe used in the video?
A: The recipe used in the video is from the Gardner family in Boston and it includes both pumpkin and apple slices. The recipe also calls for large quantities to serve many people.

Q: What is the name of the recipe book used in the video?
A: The recipe book used in the video is called “Mrs. Gardner’s Receipts from 1763”.

Q: How many apples were required for the recipe?
A: The recipe required a quarter of a hundred apples, which is equivalent to 25 apples.

Q: What was the first step in the recipe?
A: The first step in the recipe was to peel and core 25 apples.

Q: Who else’s recipe was mentioned in the video?
A: The video mentions that there is a recipe for eel pie on the same page as the pumpkin pie recipe.

Final Notes

So there you have it, a fascinating journey into the history of pumpkin pie. From its humble origins in the 17th and 18th centuries to its iconic status as a holiday dish, pumpkin pie has certainly come a long way. It’s interesting to learn that the original pumpkin pies were not as sweet or custardy as the ones we enjoy today. And who would have thought that the popularity of Thanksgiving as a national holiday played a role in the revival of interest in colonial-era recipes?

In this YouTube video, we watched as the host, with the help of a historian, recreated a 250-year-old pumpkin pie recipe. It was intriguing to see how the recipe included not only pumpkin slices but also apple slices, highlighting the colonists’ desire to mimic European cuisine. The large quantities required by the recipe also gave us a glimpse into the communal and festive nature of enjoying these pies.

As we witnessed the host preparing and cooking the pumpkin pie, it was clear that this was not just a regular baking experience. It was a chance to step back in time and embrace the flavors and techniques of centuries past. The final product, with its rich blend of spices and perfectly baked crust, looked truly delicious.

This YouTube video not only satisfied our curiosity about the history of pumpkin pie, but also sparked our interest in exploring more historical recipes and culinary traditions. It’s amazing how food can connect us to the past and be a source of nostalgia and sentimentality.

So, if you’re ever feeling adventurous in the kitchen, why not try your hand at a 250-year-old pumpkin pie recipe? You might just discover a whole new appreciation for this classic holiday dessert. And who knows, it might even become a cherished tradition in your own family.

Thank you for joining us on this edible history journey, and we hope you enjoyed diving into the fascinating world of pumpkin pie. Stay tuned for more exciting culinary explorations in the future!

Renowned for its mouth-watering treats, the art of making tasty pies has been around for centuries. Recently, I was delighted to attend a cooking demonstration by a renowned pastry chef, who presented a classic recipe for pumpkin pie – a recipe that is 250 years old.

The renowned recipe was written by Amelia Simmons in 1796 in her cookbook titled American Cookery, and it has been a favorite among many bakers throughout the years. After all, it was the first-ever cookbook to be published in the United States.

The recipe’s procedure was quite easy to understand. I started my recipe with a simple 2-crust pastry dough. Then, I mixed together mashed pumpkin, egg whites, milk, butter, molasses, orange peel, white wine, and sugar. With a spatula, I blended the ingredients until everything was well-combined. Finally, I transferred the mixture onto the pastry and kept it refrigerated.

After an hour of chilling, I threw the pumpkin pie into the oven and baked it. To my surprise, it had come out quite beautifully. The color and texture were delightful to behold.

When it was time to sample the pie, I must admit, I was quite nervous. The 250-year-old recipe wouldn’t have been easy to replicate. But happily, my worries were unfounded. The pie had a lovely flavor that was mellow yet slightly sweet. The crust was flaky and buttery, and the filling was smooth and creamy. Needless to say, I was pleasantly pleased by the results.

Overall, I was truly delighted to have tried this 250-year-old recipe for pumpkin pie. It was an educational and enjoyable experience that I would recommend to anyone interested in cooking classic dishes recipes. Moreover, I hope that others too can try this recipe and be amazed by its flavorful goodness.


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