How to reinforce miter joints with super-strong splines. Simple woodworking jig.

How to reinforce miter joints with super-strong splines. Simple woodworking jig.


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Welcome to our blog, where we delve deeper into the fascinating world of woodworking. In today’s post, we will be discussing a clever technique to reinforce miter joints using super-strong splines, as demonstrated in the YouTube video titled “”

Picture frames are commonly reinforced at the corners with splines, traditionally inserted after gluing the frame together. However, the method showcased in this video takes a different approach, allowing for simultaneous gluing of the frame and splines. The presenter shares an easy-to-make jig using plywood or MDF, providing step-by-step instructions for its construction.

Once the jig is ready, the process is straightforward. The presenter aligns the jig alongside the rip fence and clamps the picture frame flush to the triangle piece. To ensure proper alignment of the slots, it is crucial to make the cuts on the back side without flipping the board.

The video also highlights the importance of choosing the right lumber for the splines. By resawing a scrap piece and setting the fence to the appropriate thickness, the presenter achieves a snug fit. To further enhance the strength of the splines, they are inserted with the grain perpendicular to the miter.

Once the splines are cut to their final width and glued into the slots, the excess material is trimmed off, resulting in a robust joint that surpasses the strength of traditional splines.

Intrigued by this alternative method of reinforcing miter joints? Stay tuned as we explore further tips and techniques in the world of woodworking. Remember, working smarter and safer is always essential. Microjig, the maker of the gripper, empowers craftsmen to achieve just that.

Below Table of Contents

1. Enhancing Miter Joints with Super-Strong Splines: A Simple Woodworking Jig

A common method for reinforcing the corners of picture frames is to insert splines. Usually, the slots for the splines are cut after gluing the frame together. However, there is another method that allows you to glue up the frame and the splines simultaneously. In this post, we will discuss a simple woodworking jig that enhances miter joints with super-strong splines.

To create this jig, you will need three-quarter inch or eighteen-millimeter plywood. Alternatively, MDF can also be used, as it is cost-effective and provides extra weight. The jig only needs to be slightly higher than the rip fence. Once the plywood is cut down to the appropriate size, a small square piece is attached to one edge using glue and screws for added stability.

Using the jig is straightforward. Align the jig alongside the rip fence so that it cuts through about the halfway point on the triangular plywood piece. Then, clamp the picture frame pieces with 45-degree miters to the triangle piece. It is important to make sure that all of the slots line up by making the cuts on the backside of the board, without flipping it. This ensures that the grain of the spline runs perpendicular, resulting in strong joints.

To create the splines, start by resawing a scrap piece of lumber to determine the thickness needed. Set up the table saw fence accordingly, making sure to keep the workpiece pressed against the fence with the help of a feather board. The splines should fit snugly into the slots. For maximum strength, the splines should be inserted with their grain going perpendicular to the miter. Choose a board wider than the diagonal of the miter to achieve this.

Once the splines have been cut to their final width, they can be glued into the slots of the picture frame. After the glue has dried, trim off any excess splines. This alternative type of spline provides superior strength compared to the usual method that only goes about halfway through the miter. Feel free to customize the splines according to your preference.

2. Step-by-Step Guide: Reinforcing Picture Frame Corners with Splines

Reinforcing picture frame corners with splines is a common method used to add strength and durability to the frame. Typically, the splines are inserted into slots cut in the corners after the frame has been glued together. However, there is an alternative method that allows you to glue up both the frame and the splines at the same time. In this step-by-step guide, we’ll show you how to create a simple jig that makes this process easy.

To start, you’ll need a piece of three-quarter inch or eighteen millimeter plywood. MDF is also a suitable choice due to its affordability and weight. Cut the piece to a height slightly taller than your rip fence. Next, you’ll need a smaller square piece that should be aligned with the longer piece’s edge and glued in place. Adding a few screws will help secure it while the glue dries. Now, raise the blade and square up the entire assembly.

Using the jig is straightforward. Position it alongside your rip fence so that it cuts through the halfway point of the plywood triangle. Cut all the pieces for your picture frame with 45-degree miters on each end and clamp them flush against the triangle piece. It’s crucial to ensure that all the slots line up by making the cuts on the back side of the board without flipping it. There are various ways to cut the splines, but for the strongest result, we recommend resawing a scrap piece of lumber to determine the thickness of the spline. Cut the splines with their grain going perpendicular to the miter by selecting a board wider than the diagonal of your miter.

Once the splines have been cut to their final width, glue them into the slots before gluing up the entire frame. After the glue has dried, you can trim off any excess splines, resulting in a stronger reinforcement compared to the traditional method. Feel free to customize this alternative type of spline to suit your preferences and create picture frames that are not only attractive but also built to last.

By following this step-by-step guide, you’ll be able to reinforce the corners of your picture frames with splines using a simple jig. This technique provides added strength and durability to your frames, ensuring that they remain sturdy for years to come. Try out this method on your next picture frame project and experience the benefits of this alternative approach.

3. How to Make a DIY Woodworking Jig for Gluing up Frames and Splines Simultaneously

A common method for reinforcing the corners of picture frames is to insert splines. Typically, this involves cutting slots in the corners and inserting the splines after gluing the frame together. However, there’s another method that allows you to glue up the frame and the splines simultaneously. In this post, we’ll show you how to make a DIY woodworking jig for this purpose.

To make the jig, you’ll need three-quarter inch or eighteen millimeter plywood or MDF. Start by cutting a piece that is slightly higher than your rip fence. Then, create a square piece and glue it to the longer piece, making sure the corners are aligned. Additionally, you can reinforce it with a couple of screws for extra stability.

Using the jig is straightforward. Align it alongside your rip fence so that it cuts through about the halfway point on a plywood triangle. Clamp the picture frame pieces with 45-degree miters flush against the triangle piece. It’s important to ensure that all the slots line up by making the cut on the back side of the board instead of flipping it.

Now, it’s time to cut the splines. Begin by resawing a scrap piece of lumber to determine the thickness of the spline. Set your fence to the desired thickness and use a feather board for added stability. For stronger splines, cut them with the grain going perpendicular and make sure to choose a board wider than the diagonal of your miter. After cutting the splines to their final width, glue them into the slots and proceed with gluing up the picture frame as usual.

This alternative type of spline provides stronger reinforcement compared to the traditional method. Once the glue is dry, trim off the excess splines, and your frame is ready. Feel free to customize the splines to your liking. With this DIY woodworking jig, you can easily and efficiently glue up frames and splines simultaneously, saving time and ensuring a sturdy final product.

4. Achieve Unbreakable Miter Joints with This Easy-to-Build Spline Reinforcement Jig

One common method for reinforcing the corners of picture frames is to use splines. Typically, the slots for the splines are cut after gluing the frame together. However, there is another method that allows you to glue up the frame and insert the splines all at once. This can be achieved by using an easy-to-build spline reinforcement jig. Made from three-quarter inch or eighteen-millimeter plywood, this jig is simple and effective.

To create the jig, start by cutting a piece of plywood slightly higher than the rip fence. Then, attach a square piece to the edge of the longer piece using glue and screws for added stability. Once the assembly is squared up, it can be used alongside the rip fence. Simply align it so that it cuts through the halfway point of a plywood triangle. The picture frame, with 45-degree miters on each end, can be clamped flush to the triangle piece.

For the strongest splines, it is recommended to cut them with the grain perpendicular to the diagonal of the miter. To determine the thickness of the spline, resaw a scrap piece of lumber and set the fence accordingly. It is important to use a wider board than the diagonal of the miter for extra strength. After cutting the splines to their final width, they can be glued into the slots of the frame. Once the glue is dry, the excess splines can be trimmed off. This alternative type of spline provides a much stronger reinforcement compared to traditional methods.

In conclusion, by using the easy-to-build spline reinforcement jig, achieving unbreakable miter joints becomes a straightforward process. This jig allows for the simultaneous gluing of the frame and insertion of the splines, resulting in enhanced strength. With the option to customize the splines, you can create frames that are not only secure but also tailored to your preferences. So why settle for weaker joints when you can easily boost the durability of your picture frames?

Q&A

Q&A Blog Post: How to Reinforce Miter Joints with Super-Strong Splines. Simple Woodworking Jig.

Q: What is the purpose of reinforcing miter joints with splines?
A: Reinforcing miter joints with splines helps to add strength and stability to the corners of picture frames or other woodworking projects.

Q: What is the typical method of using splines in picture frames?
A: The typical method involves cutting slots in the corners of the frame and then inserting the splines after gluing the frame together.

Q: How is the method described in the YouTube video different from the typical method?
A: The method shown in the video allows you to glue up the frame and the splines all at once, making the process more efficient.

Q: What type of material is recommended for making the jig?
A: The video suggests using three-quarter inch or eighteen millimeter plywood for the jig. Alternatively, MDF (medium-density fiberboard) is also a good choice due to its affordability and weight.

Q: How is the jig assembled?
A: The jig is made by cutting a piece of plywood to a height slightly above the rip fence, then attaching a square piece to create a guide. Screws can be used to secure the pieces together if desired.

Q: How is the jig used?
A: The jig is aligned alongside the rip fence and positioned to cut through the halfway point of a plywood triangle. The frame with 45-degree miters on each end is then clamped flush to the triangle piece.

Q: What is the important step when cutting the slots for the splines?
A: To ensure that all the slots line up correctly, it is important to make the cut on the backside of the board without flipping it.

Q: How can the splines be cut and fitted for maximum strength?
A: A scrap piece of lumber is resawn to determine the thickness of the spline. The spline is then cut with the grain going perpendicular for maximum strength. A wider board is chosen to accommodate the diagonal of the miter joint.

Q: How are the splines inserted and glued?
A: The splines are glued into the slots before gluing the frame together. Excess splines can be trimmed off once the glue is dry.

Q: How does using this alternative type of spline differ from the usual method?
A: This alternative type of spline, with the splines going all the way through the miter joint, is stronger than the usual type that goes only halfway through.

Q: Can these splines be customized?
A: Yes, the splines can be customized according to personal preference or project requirements.

Note: This Q&A blog post is a professional and informative overview of the topics discussed in the YouTube video “” The tone is professional to match the style and content of the video.

Final Notes

In conclusion, this YouTube video discusses a simple woodworking jig that allows you to reinforce miter joints with super-strong splines. The traditional method of inserting splines after gluing the frame together is effective, but there is an alternative method that allows you to glue up the frame and the splines all at once. By using a specially made jig, you can easily create this alternative type of spline.

The jig can be made using three quarter inch or eighteen millimeter plywood, or MDF for added weight and affordability. By cutting slots in the corners and inserting the splines, you can reinforce the corners of picture frames for added strength. The jig is simple to use, just align it alongside the rip fence to cut through the halfway point on the plywood triangle. Then, clamp the picture frame flush to the triangle piece and make the cut on the back side to ensure all the slots line up.

To create the splines, you can use a scrap piece of lumber and resaw it to determine the thickness. Set the fence on the saw accordingly and use a feather board to keep the lumber pressed against the fence. It’s important to cut the splines with the grain going perpendicular to ensure maximum strength. Once the splines are cut to their final width, glue them into the slots before gluing the picture frame together.

The resulting splines are much stronger than usual splines that only go halfway through the miter. With this alternative method, you can customize the splines to your liking and create picture frames with reinforced corners. By following this process, you can enhance the durability and longevity of your woodworking projects.

In conclusion, this simple woodworking jig offers a professional and efficient solution for reinforcing miter joints with super-strong splines. The alternative method presented in this video provides a convenient way to glue up the frame and the splines simultaneously, resulting in a stronger and more durable final product. Give this technique a try and elevate your woodworking projects to the next level.
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In the world of woodworking, miter joints are an oft-used method of making strong, aesthetically-pleasing edges. For some high-intensity applications, however, they may not be sufficiently strong. Fortunately, there is a way to reinforce miter joints that can create a joint even stronger than the wood itself: splines. This method of reinforcement requires a woodworking jig, but the steps are simple and straightforward.

The first step is to create a slot in the joint. This can be done using a special router bit on a router table, by hand, or by using a dado blade on a table saw. Both a slot on the surface and a deeper groove in the joint should be created. The amount of slots and grooves will depend on the size and width of the material being used.

The next step is to cut the splines. This is where the woodworking jig comes in. The spline should be slightly thinner than the slot so that it fits into slot securely. To build the jig, a jig plate must be used to secure a workpiece into the jig. A template for the spline can also be created to ensure consistency in size and shape.

Once the spline has been cut, it should be inserted into the slot. The spline should be cut flush to the surface using a flush trim saw. Once the spline is in place, a dab of wood glue should be applied to the ends of the spline and on the surface of the joint.

Finally, once the glue has had a chance to dry, the pieces should be screwed together for extra reinforcement. This will create a joint even stronger than the wood itself.

Using this simple woodworking jig, woodworkers can create a splined miter joint that is much stronger than a more traditional miter joint. This method of reinforcement is especially useful in applications that demand a stronger joint than what is available with standard miter joints.


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